ACOEM Publishes New Research on Obstructive Sleep Apnea

American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine pic

American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Image: acoem.org

A graduate of the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, William D. Jones, MD, oversees his private practice in Oklahoma City, OK. In an effort to better serve his OK patients, William D. Jones, MD, continues his education and training as a member of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM).

The ACOEM has supported the advancement of worker health care for more than 100 years. With a focus on preventive medicine, ACOEM aids its membership by offering a number of educational opportunities, including its annual conference each spring and the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

In the June issue of Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, a new paper revealed that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects more than 40 percent of commercial drivers. Of that total, roughly the majority measured as mild cases, but about 12 percent fell into the moderate to severe categories of OSA.

Medical researchers used sleep laboratories for their testing, and the data came from 16 separate studies. The findings laid the ground for future research, as the implications of this body of work hint toward potential correlations between OSA and driving accidents, comorbidities, and occupational disabilities.

ACOEM Releases New Online Integrated Health Course

American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine  pic

American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Image: acoem.org

Based in Oklahoma City, OK, William D. Jones, MD, is a physician who has maintained a private practice specializing in occupational therapy and preventive treatments for more than two decades. Alongside his day-to-day practice in Oklahoma City, OK, William D. Jones, MD, is a member of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM).

In partnership with the University of Illinois Chicago (UIC) School of Public Health, ACOEM has launched a new online curriculum that will help companies seamlessly incorporate health and safety education into their everyday operations, with the goal of improving worker productivity while investing in their overall wellness. The program, entitled, “Fundamentals of Integrated Health and Safety,” contains seven different online modules that incorporate innovative research and practical steps to implement health and safety initiatives.

This comprehensive resource provides a procedural blueprint consisting of guidance in key areas such as data collection, how to effectively manage an overall employee population’s health, development of specific teams, and other topics. Individuals who successfully finish all the modules will receive a certificate of recognition from the UIC School of Public Health.

Tips for New Gym Members

55af68aa_main-image.xxxlarge_2xWilliam D. Jones, MD, is a self-employed physician based in Oklahoma City, OK, where he specializes in occupational and preventive medicine. In his free time, William D. Jones, MD, of OK enjoys working out at the gym.

Purchasing a gym membership can be helpful in motivating you to incorporate regular exercise into your routine. However, to maximize your gym experience, there are some things to learn after you sign up. It can be helpful to determine the gym’s peak times. This is especially pertinent for newcomers who are self-conscious, individuals who enjoy working out when the gym is relatively quiet, and for those who do not have time to wait for a machine.

Beginners should start out simply and slowly. Taking on a too intensive of a workout before you are ready is almost a sure way to burn out on the gym and stop going. Finally, one of the best ways to stick to a gym routine is to find a workout buddy.

Boosting the Immune System Through Diet

Boosting Immunity pic

Boosting Immunity
Image: WebMD.com

For more than 20 years, William D. Jones, MD, has cared for patients at his independent practice in Oklahoma City, OK. Focusing on preventive medicine, William D. Jones, MD, is committed to helping patients stay healthy.

Washing one’s hands and covering sneezes are still some of the best ways to prevent colds and flu, but healthful eating can be an important and enjoyable strategy as well. Experts recommend fresh fruits and vegetables as excellent sources of phytochemicals, a type of plant compound prevalent in red, yellow, and dark green produce. Leafy greens also stand out as rich sources of vitamin C, which can shorten the duration of a viral infection. Darker greens and cooked greens tend to have a higher concentration of nutrients.

Foods cooked with garlic and onions offer immune-boosting and antiviral properties as well. Garlic contains the antimicrobial and antibacterial compound allicin, which simultaneously promote healthy digestive processes that help the body to eliminate toxins. The spice turmeric, an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compound, has also proven effective at processing toxins if taken on a daily basis. These flavoring agents can be useful in meals such as soup or chili, both of which also provide the benefits of vitamin-rich vegetables and lean meats for overall health.

Strategies for Heart Disease Prevention

As medical director of a private practice in Oklahoma City, OK, William D. Jones, MD, specializes in preventive and occupational medicine. William D. Jones, MD, has operated his OK practice since 1996, following completion of his residency with the University of Oklahoma’s Department of Family and Preventive Medicine.

Heart disease prevention requires a person to make healthy living choices no matter his or her age, and it begins with the avoidance of smoking. Tobacco damages the blood vessels as well as the chambers of the heart, while the carbon monoxide in smoke reduces blood oxygen concentrations and makes the heart work harder. A lifelong personal ban on smoking is best, but even quitting reduces one’s risk to baseline in approximately five years.

Heart health also requires a healthy diet with plenty of fresh produce and whole grains. Low-fat proteins play a key role in keeping the cardiovascular system healthy, and lean fats are important elements in reducing bad cholesterol. Regular exercise is important as well. Experts recommend a minimum of 150 minutes of moderately intense activity or 75 minutes of vigorous activity for adults each week. Children, by contrast, need 60 or more minutes of exercise per day.