Personal Protective Equipment Benefits for Companies and Employees

With an MD from Brown University, William D. Jones is an Oklahoma City, OK resident and an experienced doctor. At his private practice in Oklahoma, William D. Jones, MD offers preventive medicine services and sources personal protective equipment to healthcare workers.

Personal protective equipment (PPE) help people not get infected at the workplace. They can provide workplace safety and prevent people from being exposed to chemical substances that could harm them. Even if employees get infected or exposed to germs or bacteria, PPE minimizes the risks and can be why an employee is not heavily hurt. PPE also reduces the risk of transmission of germs or bacteria from one employee to another.

This can benefit companies and businesses of all kinds as it can secure larger manpower since people won’t get sick or injured. Investments in PPE send a strong message to both clients and potential employees that the company values people. It can also save costs from workers’ comp claims and personal injury cases if a person is indeed injured due to the company’s negligence.

Three Health Communications Challenges During the COVID-19 Pandemic

William D. Jones, MD, works in occupational medicine at his practice in Oklahoma City, OK. A member of the American Medical Association since 1988, William D. Jones, MD, of Oklahoma (OK) is certified by the Oklahoma Board of Medical Licensure. One current concern for him and other other medical practitioners is communication about non-COVID-related questions.

Major concerns facing non-COVID patients attending medical appointments and procedures range from lack of a straightforward process after arriving for the appointment, the protective items and medical certificates must-haves in the facility, and the availability of in-vehicle registration to minimize physical contact.

Ironically, telemedicine offers a new communication challenge though it accords a safe avenue to access medical attention. As much as healthcare providers encourage and educate the public on the benefits of telemedicine, studies show that most adults do not understand the intricacies, lack the technology, or openly ignore the benefits, preferring physical facility visits instead.

What Are Employee Protections under FFCR Act?

William D. Jones, MD, of Oklahoma City, OK, has over 25 years of experience in medicine. In addition to working in healthcare, William D. Jones, MD, has also been in private practice – also located in Oklahoma City, OK – for almost 24 years with focus areas that include occupational and preventive medicine.

In recent months, COVID-19 has been a priority in the state for all healthcare providers and the public at large, with legislation being enacted to protect everyone’s health and financial security through the Families First Coronavirus Act (FFCRA). FFCRA requires certain employers with fewer than 500 employees to provide certain types of leave to employees for COVID-19-specific reasons.

Effective through the end of 2020, the law makes provisions for paid sick leave, family leave, or medical leave. The law allows for two weeks of paid sick leave if a person has to be quarantined or is dealing with symptoms of COVID-19, two weeks of paid sick leave but at two-thirds the employee’s pay rate to care for an individual with the virus, and “an additional 10 weeks of paid expanded family and medical leave at two-thirds” of the employees pay rate to care for a child.

The Act specifies what conditions that qualify under FFCRA and include:

*federal, state, or local order to quarantine because of the virus.
*when employees are advised by healthcare providers to self-isolate.
*if an employee is seeking a diagnosis and experiencing symptoms.
*if an employee is caring for an individual or a child with COVID-19.
*if an employee has to remain home to care for child as result of school closures.

The Long Term Impact of COVID-19 on the American Workplace

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An Oklahoma City preventive care and occupational health physician, William D. Jones, MD emphasizes patient-focused care. One area in which William D. Jones, MD has a strong interest in is the impact that COVID-19 has in the workplace.

A recent article in Forbes brought attention to the way people’s work will be impacted in the long term. One is that corporate flexibility when it comes to remote working will become widespread. Many companies will either maintain a virtual workforce or offer a work from home (WFH) option to those who choose it. While WFH is not possible in every type of job, there are many positions that center on sitting at a desk using a computer.

At the same time, barring the quick development of a vaccine, those job sites that require physical presence are not likely to allow normal social interactions for a lengthy period after opening. Social distancing, temperature checks, and barriers between individual workspaces will be the norm, both as a way of protecting worker health and maintaining legal accountability.

The bottom line is that for a majority of working Americans, adaptations will need to be made to their normal way of working for months and potentially years.

ACOEM Reports on New Framework for Evaluating Workers’ Wellness

 

American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine pic

American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Image: acoem.org

Since 1994, William D. Jones, MD, has provided occupational and preventive care in Oklahoma City, OK. The secretary and treasurer of the Oklahoma College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, William D. Jones, MD, of OK belongs to the organization’s national counterpart, the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

The July 2018 issue of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine reported on a new framework for evaluating the overall well-being of workers. Developed by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the framework examines the work and personal life factors that create a holistic understanding of the aspects that contribute to employees’ well-being. In addition, it assesses the effects of workers’ subjective experiences and observable aspects of the external environment.

The framework covers five distinct domains:

1. Physical environment and workplace safety climate.
2. Company policies, programs, and practices that may affect workers’ wellness.
3. Contributing factors to workers’ mental and physical health status.
4. Workplace evaluation and experiences that influence the quality of work life.
5. Home, community, and society as influential factors outside of the workplace.

Airedale Terriers – Beloved Companions

Airedale Terrier pic

Airedale Terrier
Image: akc.org

William D. Jones, a self-employed MD in Oklahoma City, OK, enjoys spending time with dogs when he is not busy with work. In addition to serving as secretary of the Irish Setter Club of Oklahoma dog show, William D. Jones, MD, likes to spend time with his own Airedale Terrier puppy, Cooper.

Airedale Terriers, the largest terrier breed, perform well in just about any context, boasting some of the greatest versatility of any dog breed. They are bred out of the Otterhound as well as several terrier breeds, some of which are now existing. The Airedale can play the role of a childhood companion, big game hunter, duck hunter, and home guardian. It has even served in the armed forces, with varied responsibilities including sentry and messenger.

Due to the breed’s large size for a terrier, powerful build, and high energy level, most Airedales require some degree of obedience training. Their intelligence means they learn commands quickly, and their faithful nature helps them bond with owners and their families. They need regular stimulation, though, so those who can’t spend a lot of time with an Airedale should consider providing it with toys that are stimulating and challenging to play with.

The 2018 AMA Research Symposium in Maryland

2018 AMA Research Symposium pic

2018 AMA Research Symposium
Image: ama-assn.org

An occupational and primary preventive medicine professional with nearly three decades of experience, Dr. William D. Jones earned his MD from Brown University and then completed his residency training at the University of Oklahoma in Oklahoma City, OK. Professionally, William D. Jones, MD, maintains membership in professional organizations such as the American Medical Association (AMA).

A leader in the medical field, AMA has supported research efforts, assisted with the development of public health policies, and served a wide membership of medical professionals since its founding in 1847. The association hosts numerous events every year for its members, including its Research Symposium.

The 2018 AMA Research Symposium will take place in National Harbor, Maryland, on November 9 at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center. Hundreds of individuals from across the nation will present their original scientific research at the event. Those eligible to submit abstracts for the annual Research Symposium include medical students, fellows, residents, and candidates with Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) certification.

Sleeping In on Weekends Decreases Risk of Death

 

William D Jones MD pic

William D Jones MD

A resident of Oklahoma City, OK, William D. Jones, MD, is a physician focusing on occupational and preventive medicine. Having received his doctor of medicine from Brown University, William D. Jones, MD, operates his own private practice for patients in Oklahoma City, OK.

Sleep is an essential part of preventive care. In fact, physicians almost always recommend that patients get an adequate amount of rest in order to best recover from diseases and illnesses.

A new study coming out of Sweden claims that people who sleep in during the weekend have a lower risk of death. On the other hand, people who get less than five hours of sleep each night increase their rate of mortality by 52 percent. The good news for those on a tight weekday schedule is that the higher mortality rate can be lessened or eliminated by reclaiming the lost sleep during the weekends.

Examining the data of more than 43,000 subjects, the researchers still recommend a proper amount of sleep each night, no matter what day of the week it is. They also found that both insufficient and excessive sleep generally lead to a higher risk of death.

How Office Workers Can Reduce Back Pain

 

Back Painpic

Back Pain
Image: spineuniverse.com

William D. Jones, MD, serves as an independent occupational and preventive medicine physician in Oklahoma City, OK. William D. Jones, MD, helps his patients to guard against and manage a variety of work-related illnesses and injuries, including back pain.

Back pain is a common complaint among professionals who spend a great deal of time sitting at their desks. While the fixed position of sitting in a chair increases the amount of pressure placed on the intervertebral discs and tightens the muscles of the back, poor posture can easily exacerbate it. Slouching or slumping in a chair can not only strain the discs but also stretch the ligaments and other nearby structures, which can cause or worsen pain.

Many experts find that you can reduce the temptation to slouch by adjusting the height of the computer keyboard, which should be positioned so that your elbows can be bent at a 90-degree angle without the upper back coming forward. Likewise, they recommend keeping the bottom edge of the computer monitor close to level with your chin, which will help to keep the back and neck straight.

You may also find that your back pain decreases with a proper adjustment of your office chair. The seat should be adjusted to allow you to sit with your thighs parallel to the floor with your feet flat. A slight slope of the thighs is usually comfortable, but a footrest can make it easier for you to keep your feet firmly grounded.

Benefits of Team Sports for Adults

 

William D Jones MD pic

William D Jones MD

William D. Jones, MD, practices occupational and preventive medicine in Oklahoma City, OK. In his free time, William D. Jones, MD, of OK enjoys playing slow-pitch softball for both a men’s league and a co-ed league.

Just as they do for children, team sports offer adults physical, social, and mental benefits. Team sports challenge the athlete cognitively, as he or she must be aware of what is going on within the game at all times and often needs to make split-second decisions based on others’ actions during play. Because these decisions often involve quick communication with teammates, the process involves even more focus and is even more mentally challenging.

Responsibility to one’s team also encourages a player to become more disciplined and motivated to play at a high level. Accountability to others not only gives the athlete a goal to work toward, but also helps to keep him or her working past challenges. The interest in contributing toward that goal helps to keep the athlete, as well as the group, focused, an invaluable skill both on and off the field.

Meanwhile, the constantly changing activity level of team play means that the athlete gets a varied workout. Unlike individual exercise, in which the athlete typically works at the same level for extended periods of time before taking a break, the team athlete will run, jump, stop, throw, and catch in quick succession. This works different muscle groups and different levels while offering more challenges to the cardiovascular system.