Tips for Summer Lawn Care

Summer Lawn Care pic

Summer Lawn Care
Image: consumerreports.org

William D. Jones, MD, serves as an independent occupational and preventive care specialist in Oklahoma City, OK. In his free time, William D. Jones, MD, enjoys maintaining the lawn of his Oklahoma (OK) home.

During the summer months, heat and dry conditions can combine with overuse to threaten the health of a lawn. Regular watering is one of the most effective actions a homeowner can take to keep his or her lawn healthy, though this must happen consistently. A rain guage can help the owner to ensure that the lawn receives an inch or more of water per week, though it is important that delivery of this moisture occur at regular intervals and early enough in the day that it does not evaporate in the heat.

A lawn does need mowing as it continues to grow, though the homeowner should take care not to cut it too short. Tall grasses more effectively absorb sunlight and maintain healthy moisture levels in the hot summer days. When mowing does become necessary, the blades should be at the mower’s highest setting, and clippings should be distributed across the grass as a natural fertilizer.

Homeowners should remove leaves and other debris from the lawn, however, as they can damage the soil. Areas of the lawn that seem damaged may respond to seeding, though doing so too often can do more harm than good. Watering a browned area of the lawn is also inadvisable, as it is unlikely to be effective, though these areas often heal themselves as the weather becomes cooler.

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French – A Language That Spans the Maghreb in North Africa

French pic

French
Image: thoughtco.com

Based in Oklahoma City, OK, William D. Jones, MD, practices preventive medicine in a private clinic setting. He also has experience as an occupational medicine physician in corporate settings in OK. William D. Jones, MD, has had the chance to live in France on two occasions in his life, and he speaks French fluently.

He had the opportunity to use the language during travels to locales such as Quebec and North Africa. Surprising to many travelers, French is more commonly spoken than Arabic in the Maghreb region that stretches from Morocco to Libya. One reason for this is that the local dialects of Arabic tend not to have as extensive a vocabulary selection.

Another reason is that French has simply become culturally rooted in families of the region since the Colonial era, and it defines the language relationships that they share with other people in the region. In many ways, it is a unique identifier of their backgrounds as North Africans.

A Brief Introduction to the Airedale Terrier

Airedale Terrier pic

Airedale Terrier
Image: akc.org

William D. Jones, MD, has practiced occupational and preventive medicine in the Oklahoma City, OK, area for more than two decades. In addition to his medical activities, William D. Jones, MD, spends time training his Airedale terrier and serving as dog show secretary with the Irish Setter Club of OK.

The Airedale terrier is a strong, versatile breed. However, the Airedale is not the dog for every household. Before reaching out to a trusted breeder or rescue organization about an Airedale, individuals and families should consider the dog’s behavior, energy levels, and temperament.

To start, the Airedale is a sporty terrier that demands a good deal of daily exercise. A dog that does not receive proper physical stimulation can growth lethargic or aggressive. Similarly, Airedales are keen learners. This trait is advantageous for attentive, supportive owners, but can result in destruction and mischief for families that lack the dedication necessary to successfully train a dog.

The Airedale responds well to positive reinforcement. This is the case for many breeds, but some owners prefer dogs that can be instructed under more physical styles of training. Such individuals should avoid Airedales. Finally, Airedale terriers should be raised in high-activity homes. While the overwhelming majority of Airedale owners told the American Kennel Club (AKC) that their Airedales got along well with children, other pets, and in training scenarios, 48 percent reported their terriers to dislike extended periods of time alone.

The Challenge of Using Word Gender in Learning the French Language

French Language pic

French Language
Image: pinterest.com

A medical doctor based in Oklahoma City, OK, William D. Jones, MD received his medical training from Brown University. He completed his residency training in OK and currently concentrates on occupational and preventive medicine. William D. Jones, MD has lived in France twice and is fluent in French, having studied the language from the 8th grade through his senior year in college.

French is one of the top ten most spoken languages in the world, hence it is one of the top priorities when it comes to learning another language. For native English speakers, French is one of the easier languages to learn due to its Latin base and its many vocabulary intersections with the English language.

However, learning French comes with its fair share of challenges. One of the greatest hurdles French language learners encounter is the use of gender. French words have masculine and feminine forms, which is different than English use. Moreover, there is no easy rule that covers word gender, so the learner must make an effort to remember if a particular word is masculine or feminine and be cognitively aware of it before saying it. The more that it is practiced, the easier it will be to master it.

Dog Breeds – Airedale Terriers

Airedale Terrier pic

Airedale Terrier
Image: akc.org

William D. Jones, MD, provides occupational and preventive medicine services to patients through his Oklahoma City, OK, private practice. Besides his medical commitments in OK, William D. Jones, MD, serves as the Irish Setter Club of Oklahoma’s dog-show secretary and enjoys spending time with his Airedale terrier puppy.

The American Kennel Club first recognized Airedale terriers in the late 1880s. When compared to all other breeds, Airedales are medium sized, but they are the largest of all terriers. Defined by their unusual and charming appearance, Airedales typically have a long head featuring a beard and mustache. Like other terriers, they are highly intelligent.

The origins of the breed go back to 1840s Yorkshire in England, where the ancestors of modern Airedales hunted badger and other game alongside workers in the mining and wool industries. The dog’s vaunted intelligence make it adaptable to work beyond hunting. In fact, Airedales served in a military capacity during many wars.

The breed’s intelligence, appearance, and temperament have made it a popular pet for decades. Notable Airedale owners include American presidents like Woodrow Wilson and Warren G. Harding.

Benefits of a Pre-Workout Warm-Up

Warm Up

Warm Up

 

William D. Jones, MD, serves as a preventive and occupational medicine physician in Oklahoma City, OK. In his free time, William D. Jones, MD, of Oklahoma enjoys exercising at a local gym.

For any athlete, a proper warm-up is essential as an injury avoidance technique. An effective warm-up requires a minimum of six to 10 minutes and involves both activation of the muscles and increased engagement of the cardiovascular system.

If a person has been sedentary, there is typically no more than 20 percent blood flow to the skeletal muscles, and the capillaries in these muscles are closed. Warming up helps the athlete to increase this blood flow and open the capillaries, which in turn raises muscle temperature and enables the muscles themselves to contract, relax, and transmit nerve signals more easily.

As the muscles become more responsive, they also become more difficult to injure. A cold muscle is easy to tear, just as a stiff rubber band is easier to tear. By moving the muscles gently yet continuously, each muscle worked becomes more elastic and ready for the demands of a challenging workout.

Oklahoma State Medical Association Foundation Projects

 

Oklahoma State Medical Association pic

Oklahoma State Medical Association
Image: okmed.org

William D. Jones, MD, is an Oklahoma City, OK-based physician specializing in occupational and preventive medicine. As a member of the Oklahoma State Medical Association, William D. Jones, MD, is part of an organization with a charitable foundation arm aimed at improving public health across the state.

Established in 1991, the Oklahoma State Medical Association (OSMA) Foundation promotes scientific and medical research focused on the betterment of public health. Support from the foundation may be provided through the application of assets to individuals, corporations, trusts, funds, or foundations whose research or purposes are scientific, educational, or charitable in nature.

Past initiatives supported by the OSMA foundation have been centered on topics such as obesity awareness and smoke-free families. OSMA has also provided assistance to medical students and residents in transition from clinical training to professional practices. Future programming may focus on charitable healthcare delivery and research, communication within the medical community, or continuing medical education programs for physicians.

The Angel’s Foundation

William D Jones MD pic

William D Jones MD

William D. Jones, MD, of Oklahoma City, OK, specializes in occupational and preventive medicine. In addition to seeing patients and running his office, William D. Jones, MD, enjoys giving back to his community. One of the ways he does this is sponsorship of the SWAT Academy, which is a training facility for youth softball and baseball players. Dr. Jones also sponsors the Angel’s Foundation, a non-profit that provides financial support to families so that their children can participate in sports.

The Angel’s Foundation recognizes the important part that playing sports has on a child’s life. Participating in team sports can help a child gain important skills and knowledge for adulthood, and is a fun way to keep active. The Angel’s Foundation encourages its donors, mostly local business people, to remember the fun they had playing sports throughout their own childhood.

The SWAT teams also raise funds for the Angel’s Foundation through a variety of means, including selling hot dogs at their events. All profits go directly to the Foundation.

Pork Rillettes and the Pissaladiere – Classic French Hors d’Oeuvres

pork rillettes

pork rillettes

William D. Jones, MD, has two decades of experience treating Oklahoma City, OK, patients through quality preventive and occupational medicine. Having lived in France over two periods of his life, William D. Jones, MD, enjoys French cuisine and cooks it for his family and friends.

French cooking is known for its rich tradition of hors d’oeuvres, or appetizers, that are often served at social gatherings. One rustic pâté perfect for serving on fresh bread is pork rillettes. This rustic creation involves poaching pork in its own fat and shredding it. The rich pâté is then stored in some of that fat until it is prepared to eat, either by warming on the stovetop or in a slow cooker.

Another classic hors d’oeuvre, common in Nice, is the Provencal pissaladière, which can be made with a light puff pastry. A classic topping is onions sautéed in olive oil, often accompanied by tomatoes, thinly cut olives, and anchovies. The pissaladière can be cut into small rectangles, which makes it ideal as a finger food.

The Airedale Terrier – A Waterside Canine from Northern Yorkshire

Airedale Terrier pic

Airedale Terrier
Image: akc.org

A respected Oklahoma City, OK, physician, William D. Jones, MD, provides patients with care spanning occupational and preventive medicine. A longtime dog owner, William D. Jones, MD, has an Airedale terrier puppy named Cooper and is the Irish Setter Club of Oklahoma’s dog-show secretary.

Traditionally known as the “king of terriers,” the Airedale, a large-size breed, belies the terrier’s general reputation for being small and borderline hyperactive. The breed has its origin in northern Yorkshire in the Aire River Valley, not far from the Scottish border.

The dogs were among several distinctive breeds from the area with particular abilities to control the populations of wild river animals such as rats, foxes, and martens. Considered “vermin,” these animals often dug through river banks and wreaked havoc on farmland. While smaller terriers were ideal for handling rats, the Airedale terrier suited for taking on larger animals such as martens and foxes, and was able to pursue them in the water.

A classic “waterside terrier,” the Airedale has excellent scenting and tracking abilities, and has been employed by organizations such as the Red Cross and the British Army in times of war. A family animal, the Airedale has a calm and friendly disposition.