A Brief Introduction to the Airedale Terrier

Airedale Terrier pic

Airedale Terrier
Image: akc.org

William D. Jones, MD, has practiced occupational and preventive medicine in the Oklahoma City, OK, area for more than two decades. In addition to his medical activities, William D. Jones, MD, spends time training his Airedale terrier and serving as dog show secretary with the Irish Setter Club of OK.

The Airedale terrier is a strong, versatile breed. However, the Airedale is not the dog for every household. Before reaching out to a trusted breeder or rescue organization about an Airedale, individuals and families should consider the dog’s behavior, energy levels, and temperament.

To start, the Airedale is a sporty terrier that demands a good deal of daily exercise. A dog that does not receive proper physical stimulation can growth lethargic or aggressive. Similarly, Airedales are keen learners. This trait is advantageous for attentive, supportive owners, but can result in destruction and mischief for families that lack the dedication necessary to successfully train a dog.

The Airedale responds well to positive reinforcement. This is the case for many breeds, but some owners prefer dogs that can be instructed under more physical styles of training. Such individuals should avoid Airedales. Finally, Airedale terriers should be raised in high-activity homes. While the overwhelming majority of Airedale owners told the American Kennel Club (AKC) that their Airedales got along well with children, other pets, and in training scenarios, 48 percent reported their terriers to dislike extended periods of time alone.

The Airedale Terrier – A Waterside Canine from Northern Yorkshire

Airedale Terrier pic

Airedale Terrier
Image: akc.org

A respected Oklahoma City, OK, physician, William D. Jones, MD, provides patients with care spanning occupational and preventive medicine. A longtime dog owner, William D. Jones, MD, has an Airedale terrier puppy named Cooper and is the Irish Setter Club of Oklahoma’s dog-show secretary.

Traditionally known as the “king of terriers,” the Airedale, a large-size breed, belies the terrier’s general reputation for being small and borderline hyperactive. The breed has its origin in northern Yorkshire in the Aire River Valley, not far from the Scottish border.

The dogs were among several distinctive breeds from the area with particular abilities to control the populations of wild river animals such as rats, foxes, and martens. Considered “vermin,” these animals often dug through river banks and wreaked havoc on farmland. While smaller terriers were ideal for handling rats, the Airedale terrier suited for taking on larger animals such as martens and foxes, and was able to pursue them in the water.

A classic “waterside terrier,” the Airedale has excellent scenting and tracking abilities, and has been employed by organizations such as the Red Cross and the British Army in times of war. A family animal, the Airedale has a calm and friendly disposition.