AMA Adopts New Policies to Address National HIV Epidemic

American Medical Association pic

American Medical Association
Image: wire.ama-assn.org

A medical doctor based in Oklahoma City, OK, William D. Jones MD specializes in occupational and preventive medicine. Since 1988, Oklahoma City, OK-based physician William D. Jones has held membership in the American Medical Association.

The leading national physician organization in the U.S., the American Medical Association (AMA) recently adopted new policies that seek to address the HIV epidemic as the result of a vote at its Annual Meeting. At the core of the new policy, the AMA will concentrate more of its fundraising efforts on plans that aim to accomplish such goals as diagnosing individuals who have contracted HIV as early as possible and treating HIV infection to bring about sustained viral suppression.

As an additional step toward suppressing the HIV epidemic in the U.S., the AMA adopted a policy that aims to de-stigmatize HIV infection. Through the policy, the AMA will advocate for the repeal of state laws that criminalize the non-disclosure of HIV status. It seeks to accomplish this in part by creating a new program to educate health care professionals, physicians, and the public on new techniques for reducing the risk of HIV transmission.

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AMA Targets Sugar-sweetened Beverages

American Medical Association pic

American Medical Association
Image: wire.ama-assn.org

Based in Oklahoma City, OK, William D. Jones, MD, has operated his own private medical practice focused on occupational therapy and preventive medicine for nearly 20 years. Active in his field, William D. Jones, MD, spends time away from his Oklahoma City, OK, practice engaging with professional organizations that further his education, such as the American Medical Association.

The American Medical Association recently updated its policy position to address the rising epidemic of type 2 diabetes and its link to sugary beverage consumption. With FDA figures estimating that Americans consume nearly 16 percent of their total daily calories as “empty” sugars, educating the public about sugar-sweetened drinks and their effect on overall health is the route that the AMA is choosing to take to address the issue.

Some of the new recommendations that the AMA will push for on a legislative level include limiting the access and sale of sugary beverages in elementary and high schools, as well as the implementation of mandatory warning labels that clearly outline the health risks that come with excessive consumption of these drinks.