A Brief Overview of the Camino de Santiago Trail

Camino de Santiago Trail
Image: rei.com

A resident of Oklahoma City, OK, William D. Jones, MD, specializes in occupational and preventive medicine, and is the secretary and treasurer for the Oklahoma College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Aside from his professional duties, William D. Jones, MD, enjoys fitness and travel, both locally and outside of OK. Dr. Jones plans to travel to Spain to hike the Camino de Santiago trail during the summer season.

The Camino de Santiago trail is an ancient Catholic pilgrimage now traveled by thousands of people each year on foot, horseback, and bike. There are several route options to choose along the Camino de Santiago, with some of the main ones including the Camino Frances (which starts in St. Jean Pied-du-Port and provides a variety of scenery) and Camino del Norte (which runs along the North Coast of Spain). Also popular, the Camino Portugués starts in Lisbon, goes through Northern Portugal, and is relatively flat compared to some of the other routes.

Most of the Camino de Santiago trail consists of well-maintained tracks or pavement, which makes it easy for travelers with little backpacking experience. Plentiful infrastructure along the trail also provides hikers with numerous options to stay overnight, thus eliminating the need to plan every detail of the hike. Upon completing 62 miles or more of the hike, travelers receive either a certificate of completion or a pilgrim certificate (if it was completed for religious reasons by a Catholic believer).

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