Camino de Santiago: A Scenic Pilgrimage Ancient Trail

A specialist in occupational and preventive medicine, William D. Jones, MD has since 1996, managed his private practice in Oklahoma City, OK. During his medical career, he served as the medical director, Department of Occupational Medicine at Norman Regional Hospital in Norman, OK. William D. Jones, MD loves hiking and intends on hiking the Camino de Santiago again when Covid-19 restrictions are lifted in France and Spain.

The Camino de Santiago in Spain is a well-known ancient hiking trail that attracts pilgrims from all over the world. Camino de Santiago in English is known as the Way of St. James. All Camino pilgrimage routes end up at Santiago de Compostela in northwestern Spain where it is believed the remains of St. James were discovered in the ninth century. In the 10th, 11th, 12th centuries, the pilgrimage was widely visited before becoming popular again in the recent years. The Camino Francés (the French Way) is the most popular trail because of its diverse scenery and good infrastructure. The route begins from St. Jean Pied-du-Port in France and passes through Burgos, Pamplona, Leon and numerous smaller towns and villages. The entire route is about 500 miles long.

While some people visit Camino de Santiago for spiritual purposes, others do it recreationally. Receiving more than 100,000 visitors annually, the adventure attracts people who like walking and cycling. The trail has numerous Spanish historic sites and monuments that enable visitors to interact with a wide variety of cultures, allowing walkers to meet and interact with other people from around the world.