Three Simple Tips for Improved Public Health Communications

William D. Jones, MD, has worked as an occupational and preventive medicine professional in Oklahoma City, OK, since 1994. When he is not providing medical support to patients in and around the Oklahoma City, OK, area, William D. Jones, MD, engages with professional organizations such as the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

Environmental medicine is a broad term encompassing a variety of medical specialties and procedures, all of which involve interactions between humans and the surrounding environment. More specifically, practitioners of environmental medicine train to address adverse reactions resulting from exposure to something in the environment.

Three key aspects of environmental medicine include individual susceptibility, adaptation, and the concept of “total load.” Individual susceptibility is a term used to describe a specific person’s response to an environmental excitant. There are a wide range of factors that may influence individual susceptibility, from genetic predisposition to nutritional standing.

Adaptation, meanwhile, describes the changes a person or organism goes through over time in response to environmental factors. In some cases, the body may respond positively and fight off a virus or infection. In cases of maladaptation, the adaptive mechanism breaks down and the body begins to suffer the ill effects of one or more excitants.

Finally, total load draws on both of these concepts. If a susceptible individual fails to adapt to environmental excitants over a period of time, they may hit their total load and experience a total breakdown of various homeostatic mechanisms.

More information about environmental medicine is available at the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine website, acoem.org.

About Oklahoma State Medical Association Foundation

William D. Jones MD is a practicing medical doctor based in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. He obtained his MD in medicine from Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, specializing in occupational and preventive therapy. William D. Jones is also the treasurer and secretary of the Oklahoma College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine and a member of several federal, state, and local medical associations, including the Oklahoma State Medical Association (OSMA).

Established in 1991, the Oklahoma State Medical Association Foundation seeks to improve public health using scientific and medical research. A scientific, educational and charitable foundation, OSMA focuses on the four areas established by its board member as the most crucial areas affecting patients and physicians of Oklahoma. These areas include public health, healthcare delivery, communication initiatives, and education.

OSMA is also committed to partnering with other foundations, corporations, trusts, or funds, making strides in creating transformational and sustainable change either by innovative responses to medical needs or by developing systemic and feasible solutions to public health challenges.

Benefits of a Pre-Workout Warm-Up

Warm Up

Warm Up

 

William D. Jones, MD, serves as a preventive and occupational medicine physician in Oklahoma City, OK. In his free time, William D. Jones, MD, of Oklahoma enjoys exercising at a local gym.

For any athlete, a proper warm-up is essential as an injury avoidance technique. An effective warm-up requires a minimum of six to 10 minutes and involves both activation of the muscles and increased engagement of the cardiovascular system.

If a person has been sedentary, there is typically no more than 20 percent blood flow to the skeletal muscles, and the capillaries in these muscles are closed. Warming up helps the athlete to increase this blood flow and open the capillaries, which in turn raises muscle temperature and enables the muscles themselves to contract, relax, and transmit nerve signals more easily.

As the muscles become more responsive, they also become more difficult to injure. A cold muscle is easy to tear, just as a stiff rubber band is easier to tear. By moving the muscles gently yet continuously, each muscle worked becomes more elastic and ready for the demands of a challenging workout.

Pork Rillettes and the Pissaladiere – Classic French Hors d’Oeuvres

pork rillettes

pork rillettes

William D. Jones, MD, has two decades of experience treating Oklahoma City, OK, patients through quality preventive and occupational medicine. Having lived in France over two periods of his life, William D. Jones, MD, enjoys French cuisine and cooks it for his family and friends.

French cooking is known for its rich tradition of hors d’oeuvres, or appetizers, that are often served at social gatherings. One rustic pâté perfect for serving on fresh bread is pork rillettes. This rustic creation involves poaching pork in its own fat and shredding it. The rich pâté is then stored in some of that fat until it is prepared to eat, either by warming on the stovetop or in a slow cooker.

Another classic hors d’oeuvre, common in Nice, is the Provencal pissaladière, which can be made with a light puff pastry. A classic topping is onions sautéed in olive oil, often accompanied by tomatoes, thinly cut olives, and anchovies. The pissaladière can be cut into small rectangles, which makes it ideal as a finger food.