Benefits of a Pre-Workout Warm-Up

Warm Up

Warm Up

 

William D. Jones, MD, serves as a preventive and occupational medicine physician in Oklahoma City, OK. In his free time, William D. Jones, MD, of Oklahoma enjoys exercising at a local gym.

For any athlete, a proper warm-up is essential as an injury avoidance technique. An effective warm-up requires a minimum of six to 10 minutes and involves both activation of the muscles and increased engagement of the cardiovascular system.

If a person has been sedentary, there is typically no more than 20 percent blood flow to the skeletal muscles, and the capillaries in these muscles are closed. Warming up helps the athlete to increase this blood flow and open the capillaries, which in turn raises muscle temperature and enables the muscles themselves to contract, relax, and transmit nerve signals more easily.

As the muscles become more responsive, they also become more difficult to injure. A cold muscle is easy to tear, just as a stiff rubber band is easier to tear. By moving the muscles gently yet continuously, each muscle worked becomes more elastic and ready for the demands of a challenging workout.

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Pork Rillettes and the Pissaladiere – Classic French Hors d’Oeuvres

pork rillettes

pork rillettes

William D. Jones, MD, has two decades of experience treating Oklahoma City, OK, patients through quality preventive and occupational medicine. Having lived in France over two periods of his life, William D. Jones, MD, enjoys French cuisine and cooks it for his family and friends.

French cooking is known for its rich tradition of hors d’oeuvres, or appetizers, that are often served at social gatherings. One rustic pâté perfect for serving on fresh bread is pork rillettes. This rustic creation involves poaching pork in its own fat and shredding it. The rich pâté is then stored in some of that fat until it is prepared to eat, either by warming on the stovetop or in a slow cooker.

Another classic hors d’oeuvre, common in Nice, is the Provencal pissaladière, which can be made with a light puff pastry. A classic topping is onions sautéed in olive oil, often accompanied by tomatoes, thinly cut olives, and anchovies. The pissaladière can be cut into small rectangles, which makes it ideal as a finger food.